Archive for the Science Category

Ape Woman Buried

Posted in Death, Science with tags , , , , , , , , , , on February 15, 2013 by elgrayso

This website doesn’t often feature recent news, but there was an interesting story that came out just over a week ago that I thought I would share.
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Mexican ‘ape woman’ buried 150 years after her death

An indigenous Mexican woman once described as the “ugliest woman in the world” has been buried more than 150 years after her death and a tragic life spent exhibited as a freak of nature at circuses around the world.

She sang and danced for paying audiences, becoming a sensation who also toured Europeand Russia. She and Lent married and had a son, but she developed a fever related to complications from childbirth, and died along with her baby in 1860 in Moscow. Her remains ended up at the University of Oslo in Norway.

Mexican ambassador Martha Bárcena Coqui, who is based in Copenhagen, Denmark, formally received Pastrana’s coffin at a ceremony on 7 February at Oslo University Hospital before the coffin was flown to Mexico.

“Today, it’s almost incomprehensible that a circus used corpses for entertainment purposes. Hers was used in a way we today would consider to be completely reprehensible,” he said. “It’s important that we now have a clear end to the way she was treated.” [read more from The Guardian]

Antikamnia Calendar (1899-1900)

Posted in Death, Science with tags , , , , , , , , , on February 11, 2013 by elgrayso

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The Antikamnia (Opposed to Pain) Chemical Company of St. Louis, Missouri produced several calendars (1897-1901) illiustrated with Skeleton Sketches–chromolithographed series based on watercolors by the local physician-artist Louis Crucius. The limited edition calendars were mailed to physicians who provided business cards or letterhead correspondence as evidence of their medical standing. Antikamnia was a proprietary product consisting of acetanalid (antifebrin) combined with sodium bicarbonate, citric acid and caffeine. [from UCLA Library]

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Monstrorum Historia

Posted in Art, Science with tags , , , , , , on September 24, 2012 by elgrayso

selections from Ulisse Aldrovani’s Monstorum Historia (History of Monsters), 1642

Jules Germain Cloquet

Posted in Art, Science with tags , , , , , , , , , on June 18, 2012 by elgrayso

Jules Germain Cloquet (18 December 1790 – 23 February 1883) was a French physician and surgeon who was born and practiced medicine in Paris. Cloquet was a skilled artist; in his best-known work, Anatomie de l’homme, most of the 1300 illustrations were drawn by him. He was the inventor of several surgical instruments, including an arterial forceps. He also had a keen interest in alternative medical practices such as mesmerism and acupuncture. [from Wikipedia]

LSD: A Case Study

Posted in Science, Video with tags , , , , , on March 8, 2012 by elgrayso

Alien Autopsy

Posted in Science with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on February 12, 2012 by elgrayso

Perhaps the most famous alien autopsy is supposed to have been performed on the body of an alien recovered from the crash of a “flying disk” near Roswell, New Mexico on June 2, 1947.


A 17-minute, black-and-white film of poor quality, purporting to be footage of the autopsy, surfaced in the 1990s, promoted by Ray Santilli, a London-based entrepreneur, who claimed he had received it from an unidentified, former military cameraman. The film was exposed as a hoax in 2006, when Santilli admitted the film was not in fact authentic, but a staged “reconstruction” of footage he claimed he had viewed in 1992, which had deteriorated and become unusable by the time he made his film. Santilli claimed that a few frames from the original were embedded in his film, but he never specified which ones. In 1995, before being exposed as a hoax, the film was sold to television networks and broadcast in more than 32 countries. [from Wikipedia]

Fragonard Museum

Posted in Death, Museums, Science with tags , , , , , on February 5, 2012 by elgrayso

The Musée Fragonard d’Alfort is a museum of anatomical oddities located within the École Nationale Vétérinaire de Maisons-Alfort in Maisons-Alfort, a suburb of Paris. The museum’s most astonishing items are the famous “écorchés” (flayed figures) prepared by Honoré Fragonard, the school’s first professor of anatomy, appointed in 1766 and in 1771 dismissed from the school as a madman. His speciality was the preparation and preservation of skinned cadavers, of which he prepared some 700 examples. Only 21 remain; all are on display in the museum’s final room. [from Wikipedia]

Jacques Gautier d’Agoty

Posted in Art, Science with tags , , , , on January 20, 2012 by elgrayso

Jacques Gautier d’Agoty was a French painter and engraver in the 18th century.

Spontaneous Human Combustion

Posted in Death, Photography, Science with tags , , , , on December 16, 2011 by elgrayso

Spontaneous human combustion (SHC) describes reported cases of the burning of a living human body without an apparent external source of ignition. There have been about 200 cited cases worldwide over a period of around 300 years. [from Wikipedia]

Pickled Punks

Posted in Science with tags , , , , , , on November 11, 2011 by elgrayso

“Pickled punks” is the carny term for human fetuses preserved in jars of formaldehyde and used as sideshow attractions. Most pickled punks display some sort of anatomical abnormality, such as conjoined twins or polycephaly; however, the deformities present are as varied as the nature of human inflictions. Faked pickled punks, made from rubber or wax, are known as “bouncers” for their tendency to bounce when dropped on the floor. [from Wikipedia]

Many of these were preserved by master anatomist Frederik Ruysch. I have a separate entry on him here.

Plague Doctors

Posted in Death, Science with tags , , , , , on October 20, 2011 by elgrayso

A plague doctor  was a special medical physician who saw those who had the bubonic plague. In the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, some doctors wore a beak-like mask which was filled with aromatic items. The masks were designed to protect them from putrid air, which (according to the miasmatic theory of disease) was seen as the cause of infection. The protective suit consisted of a heavy fabric overcoat that was waxed. A wooden cane pointer was used to help examine the patient without touching. [from Wikipedia]

The Kaibo Zonshinzu Anatomy Scrolls

Posted in Science with tags , , , , , , , , , on July 1, 2011 by elgrayso

Mike the Headless Chicken

Posted in Animals, Science with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 21, 2011 by elgrayso

Time Lapse Animal Decomposition

Posted in Animals, Science with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 18, 2011 by elgrayso

Rabbit

Pig

Mole

Two-Headed Dog and Decapitated Living Dog Head

Posted in Science with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 26, 2011 by elgrayso

Vladimir Petrovich Demikhov was a Soviet scientist and organ transplant pioneer, who did several transplantations in the 1930s and 1950s, such as the transplantation of a heart into an animal and a lung-heart replacement in an animal. He is also well-known for his transplantation of the heads of dogs. He conducted his dog head transplants during the 1950s, resulting in two-headed dogs, and this ultimately led to the head transplants in monkeys by Dr. Robert White, who was inspired by Demikhov’s work. [from Wikipedia]

Demikhov’s Two-Headed Dog

Roky Erickson’s song: Two-Headed Dog

chorus:

Two-headed dog two headed dog
I’ve been working in the Kremlin
With a two-headed dog

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