Archive for paris

Jules Germain Cloquet

Posted in Art, Science with tags , , , , , , , , , on June 18, 2012 by elgrayso

Jules Germain Cloquet (18 December 1790 – 23 February 1883) was a French physician and surgeon who was born and practiced medicine in Paris. Cloquet was a skilled artist; in his best-known work, Anatomie de l’homme, most of the 1300 illustrations were drawn by him. He was the inventor of several surgical instruments, including an arterial forceps. He also had a keen interest in alternative medical practices such as mesmerism and acupuncture. [from Wikipedia]

Café de L’Enfer (Hell’s Cafe)

Posted in Photography, Satan with tags , , , , , , , , , on May 29, 2012 by elgrayso

A hot spot called Hell’s Café lured 19th-century Parisians to the city’s Montmartre neighborhood—like the Marais—on the Right Bank of the Seine. With plaster lost souls writhing on its walls and a bug-eyed devil’s head for a front door, le Café de l’Enfer may have been one of the world’s first theme restaurants. According to one 1899 visitor, the café’s doorman—in a Satan suit—welcomed diners with the greeting, “Enter and be damned!” Hell’s waiters also dressed as devils. An order for three black coffees spiked with cognac was shrieked back to the kitchen as: “Three seething bumpers of molten sins, with a dash of brimstone intensifier!” [from National Geographic]

Fragonard Museum

Posted in Death, Museums, Science with tags , , , , , on February 5, 2012 by elgrayso

The Musée Fragonard d’Alfort is a museum of anatomical oddities located within the École Nationale Vétérinaire de Maisons-Alfort in Maisons-Alfort, a suburb of Paris. The museum’s most astonishing items are the famous “écorchés” (flayed figures) prepared by Honoré Fragonard, the school’s first professor of anatomy, appointed in 1766 and in 1771 dismissed from the school as a madman. His speciality was the preparation and preservation of skinned cadavers, of which he prepared some 700 examples. Only 21 remain; all are on display in the museum’s final room. [from Wikipedia]

Issei Sagawa, Cannibal

Posted in Death, Serial Killers, Video with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on January 12, 2012 by elgrayso

Sorry for the delay, guys! I try to post at least once a week, but was on vacation for the last month. Here is a story I’d planned on posting for a long time, but only recently found this short documentary on it. – elgrayso

On the afternoon of June 13, 1981, a Japanese man named Issei Sagawa walked to the Bois de Boulogne, a park on the outskirts of Paris, carrying two suitcases. The contents of those suitcases, to the lament of a nearby jogger, was the dismembered body of a fellow student – a Dutch woman named Renée Hartevelt, whom Sagawa had shot three days prior and had spent the days since eating various parts of her body.

He was soon arrested. According to reports, Issei uttered, “I killed her to eat her flesh,” when they raided his home, whereupon they found bits of Renne still in his fridge.

Sagawa was declared insane and unfit for trial and was institutionalized in Paris. His incarceration was to be short, however, as the French public soon grew weary of their hard-earned francs going to support this evil woman-eater, and Issei was promptly deported. Herein followed a bizarre and seemingly too convenient set of legal loopholes and psychiatric reports that led doctors in Japan declaring him “sane, but evil.”

On August 12, 1986, Sagawa checked himself out of Tokyo’s Matsuzawa Psychiatric hospital, and has been a free man ever since.

This is where the real story begins. VBS met up with him to find out what he’s been up to in the 30 years since. [from VICE]

VICE has made a great, short little documentary on Sagawa which you can view here.

(also if you know how to embed the video please tell me how!)